Places to visit

Thailand Historical Park

Thungyai-Huai Kha Khaeng Wildlife Sanctuaries

Thungyai-Huai Kha Khaeng Wildlife Sanctuaries


Located Kanchanaburi, Tak and Uthai Thani provinces

Stretching over more than 600,000 ha along the Myanmar border, the sanctuaries, which are relatively intact, contain examples of almost all the forest types of continental South-East Asia. They are home to a very diverse array of animals, including 77% of the large mammals (especially elephants and tigers), 50% of the large birds and 33% of the land vertebrates to be found in this region.

How to go Thungyai-Huai Kha Khaeng Wildlife Sanctuaries

There are 2 routes to the Huai Kha Khaeng reserve: First route is to enter through the reserve headquarters that is around 102 kilometres from the province. Take the Uthai Thani-Nong Chang road (Highway No. 333) past Amphoe Nong Chang to Highway No. 3438 (Nong Chang-Lan Sak) to Km. 53-54, then turn left onto a laterite road for about 14 kilometres.

Access to the Thungyai reserve is harder, as the roads are poor. Take the route Thong Pha Phum-Sangkhla Buri near Huai Suea to Khli Ti Village, a distance of 42 km. After that, there is an intersection leading to the Wildlife Sanctuary Headquarters at Huai Song Thai another 40 km.

Description & Details

The Thungyai Naresuan Wildlife Sanctuary and Huai Kha Khaeng Wildlife Sanctuary are adjacent parks in the Uthai Thani, Kanchanaburi and Tak provinces of Thailand. At 622,200 hectares combined, they form the largest protected area in Southeast Asia, and were listed as a UNESCO World Heritage Site in 1991.

The reserves consist of almost every kind of forest found in Thailand, including mountain virgin forest, dry virgin forest and pine forest. It has a total area of about 5,775 square kilometres. In addition, it is the watershed of rivers flowing to Srinakharin Dam.


The unspoiled nature of the reserve makes it an ideal home to various rare and endangered animals such as wild buffalo, rhinoceros, wild elephant, tapir, leopard, wild bull, etc.

There are 2 routes to the Huai Kha Khaeng reserve: First route is to enter through the reserve headquarters that is around 102 kilometres from the province. Take the Uthai Thani-Nong Chang road (Highway No. 333) past Amphoe Nong Chang to Highway No. 3438 (Nong Chang-Lan Sak) to Km. 53-54, then turn left onto a laterite road for about 14 kilometres.

Access to the Thungyai reserve is harder, as the roads are poor. Take the route Thong Pha Phum-Sangkhla Buri near Huai Suea to Khli Ti Village, a distance of 42 km. After that, there is an intersection leading to the Wildlife Sanctuary Headquarters at Huai Song Thai another 40 km.

Huai Kha Khaeng Wildlife Sanctuary has 3 points through which visitors can tour the area:

1. The area around the reserve headquarters is in Amphoe Lan Sak, 34 kilometres from the district. The area has an exhibition building and the Sup Nakhasathian Memorial. The Khao Hin Daeng walking nature trail is about 4 kilometres long. There is also the Pong Thian viewpoint.

2. The area around the Cyber Forest Protection Unit in Amphoe Huai Khot is the site of the Huai Kha Khaeng Nature and Wildlife Study Centre to be set up by a private organization of Suep Nakhasathian Foundation under the approval of the Royal Forest Department. The centre consists of a study, a nature trail that has direction and information signs, trailside exhibitions, and viewpoints, among others.

3. The area around Huai Mae Di Forest Protection Unit in Amphoe Ban Rai has a nature study walking trail arranged by the National Park purposes.

* Namtok Takhian Thong The waterfall is in the area of Tanao Si Mountains, the Thai-Burmese border area in Amphoe Sangkhla Buri, a part of Thung Yai Naresuan Wildlife Sanctuary. Its water source is from Myanmar flowing along the boundary mountains leading to Thailand at Huai Song Ka Lia.

Due to the completeness of the forest, water flows all year round. It takes 30 minutes to get to the first level of the waterfall with a smooth route covered with bamboo, rattan, ferns and various kinds of large trees. Sometimes, it is better to take a shortcut passing along the stream. Tourists can experience the different beauty of cascades where water flows from many directions and disperses to the basin or the wide ground.

To get there, take Highway 323, go straight on for 4 km. until you get to Amphoe Sangkhla Buri. Pass the intersection on the right leading to the Three Pagodas Pass then take the route Sangkhla Buri-Three Pagodas Pass until Km. 12-13 where you will see a sign, and the waterfall is on your right. Turn into the intersection on the laterite road for 9 km. to the car park. After that, go on foot for about 30 minutes to the first level of the waterfall at the Safeguard Unit.

* Namtok Khli Ti โ€˜Khli Tiโ€™ in Karen language means โ€˜Suea Thonโ€™ (lone tiger). The waterfall is located in Thung Yai Naresuan Wildlife Sanctuary, and its water source flows from the top of Khao Di Ka near the sanctuary. To travel to the waterfall, go on foot about 2 days from the Khli Ti Karen Village. Crews and local guide are needed.

Moreover, Namtok Khli Ti Lang is located above Khwae Yai Lake near Khao Ngu Stream. It takes 2ยฝ hours to get there by boat from Kradan Pier or Mong Krathae Pier.

Fees & Permits
Designated points in both sanctuaries, listed below, are open to visitors. Access anywhere else in the parks or staying overnight requires permission, obtained by writing at least 15 days in advance to the Director of the Wildlife Conservation Office at the National Park, Wildlife and Plant Conservation Department, Bangkhen, Bangkok or Tel. 0 2561 4292-3 ext. 765.

Kamphaeng Phet Historical Park

Kamphaeng Phet Historical Park


Kamphaeng Phet was an important city of the Sukhothai Kingdom from the 13th to 15th centuries. The earliest mention of the city appears in the stone inscriptions from Wat Mahathat and Wat Phra Sri in Kamphaeng Phet.

Kamphaeng Phet province is located south of Sukhothai province, and is 358 km away from Bangkok. Kamphaeng Phet was formerly also known as Nakhon Chom. Settlements along the Ping River were present in the 11th century. The region for a while was an outpost of the Khmer Empire, and later in the 13th century became part of the Sukhothai Kingdom. Kamphaeng Phet was not mentioned on the early Sukhothai inscription stones (while other cities were), indicating that it was initially not incorporated into the Kingdom or not of great importance. However it was recognized as a town of significance during the reign of King Li Thai.
kamphaeng phet historical park
Kamphaeng Phet was an important city of the Sukhothai Kingdom from the 13th to 15th centuries. The earliest mention of the city appears in the stone inscriptions from Wat Mahathat and Wat Phra Sri in Kamphaeng Phet. The Ayutthaya annuals mention that this city was known as โ€œMuang Chakangrauโ€ and was ruled by a prince from Sukhothai. Cultural and folk festivities are held in April each year to celebrate the Nop Phra Len Pleng Festival.

The Kamphaeng Phet historical park has been established at the Old City site, and the area is now being cared for by the Fine Arts Department. As the sites at Sukhothai and Si Satchanalai, Kamphaeng Phet also has a Wat Chang Rop, where the base of the large chedi has the laterite sculptures of the forequarters of elephants. The laterite originally was covered with stucco decorations. Some have been restored.

Major features in the Kamphang Phet Historical Park include archaeological remains of ancient sites. Services from the Tourist Centre are available. Kamphaeng Phet Historical Park has been appointed to become one of the world Heritage Site by UNESCO since 1991

Chakangrao, the ancient Kamphaeng Phet town, had the same town planning concept as the old Sukhothai and Si Satchanalai, with separate zones for religious sites both within and outside of town limits. Structures are usually large and made of laterite. Religious sites on the west bank of the Ping River at Nakhon Chum are built of bricks and of smaller size.


The Kamphaeng Phet National Museum, as most provincial museums at important historic sites, houses quite a few interesting artefacts, sculptures and Buddha images. The most well known and quite striking statue is a bronze Shiva dated from about 1510 A.D. It indicates the importance of Hindu deities, even at the time Buddhism was well established as the religion of Sukhothai and later Ayutthaya. Unfortunately, no pictures can be taken at this National Museum.

The Ayutthaya annuals mention that this city was known as โ€œMuang Chakangrauโ€ and was ruled by a prince from

Sukhothai. Cultural and folk festivities are held in April each year to celebrate the Nop Phra Len Pleng Festival.
More Infomation
Contact Kamphaeng Phet Historical Park, Muang District, Kamphaeng Phet,
tel/fax: 0 5571 1921

Sukhothai Historical Park


Sukhothai Historical Park


The Sukhothai Historical Park is the main attraction in Sukothai Province. Located 12 kilometres from Sukothai town on the Sukhothai-Tak Highway, the Historical Park is a place of ruins and temples although certainly part of Thailandโ€™s heritage, it also regarded as a World Heritage site under the auspices of UNESCO and the Thai Fine Arts Department. The capital of Thailandโ€™s first Kingdom (founded in 1238), Sukothai has considerable historical significance and is a pleasure to visit. There the original city was surrounded by walls with 4 city gates. Today the walls house a number of sites worthy to visit that include

โ€ข The Royal Palace
โ€ข Wat Mahathat,
โ€ข The Ramkhamhaeng National Museum
โ€ข The Ramkhamhaeng Monument
โ€ข Wat Si Sawai
โ€ข Wat Traphang Ngoen
โ€ข Wat Traphang Thong
โ€ข Wat Chana Songkhram,
โ€ข Wat Sa Si
โ€ข Wat Mai
โ€ข San Ta Pha Daeng (the Deity Shrine)

Therefore without a doubt the highlight of a trip to the former capital of Siam.
The park is located 12 kms. from town on the Sukhothai-Tak Highway. Ruins of the royal palaces,
Buddhist temples, the city gates, walls, moats, dams, ditches, ponds, canals, and the water dyke control system,
which was the magical and spiritual center of the kingdom, are now preserved and have been restored by the Fine
Arts Department with the cooperation of UNESCO, not only with a view of fostering Thailand's national identity but
the safeguarding a fine example of mankind's cultural heritage. The tourist Service Centre is near Wat Phra Phai Luang.
sukhothai_historical_park
The Sukhothai Historical Park covers the ruins of Sukhothai, capital of the Sukhothai kingdom in the 13th and 14th centuries, in what is now the north of Thailand. It is located near the modern city of Sukhothai, capital of the province with the same name.

The city walls form a rectangle about 2 km east-west by 1.6 km north-south. There is a gate in the centre of each wall. Inside are the remains of the royal palace and twenty-six temples, the largest being Wat Mahathat. The park is maintained by the Fine Arts Department of Thailand with help from UNESCO, which has declared it a World Heritage Site. The park sees thousands of visitors each year, who marvel at the ancient Buddha figures, palace buildings and ruined temples. The park is easily toured by bicycle or even on foot.

The protection of the area was first announced in Volume 92, Part 112 of the Royal Gazette on August 2, 1961. In 1976 the restoration project was approved, and in July 1988 the park was officially opened. On December 12, 1991, it was declared a World Heritage site, together with the associated historic parks in Kamphaeng Phet and Si Satchanalai.

The centre provides information and facilitates visitors to the Sukhothai Historical Park, as well as displays models of
historical buildings and structures in old Sukhothai.
It is open daily 08.30-16.30 hrs. Admission fee is 40 baht.

Si Satchanalai Historical Park

Si Satchanalai Historical Park


The Si Satchanalai Historical Park is a historical park in Si Satchanalai district, Sukhothai Province, northern Thailand.
A satellite town of the Sukhothai era, Si Satchanalai is located on the bank of Yom River, 50 kilometers from modern

Sukhothai. Ruins of 134 monuments have been discovered in the park. The protection of the area was first announced in Volume 92, Part 112 of the Royal Gazette on August 2, 1961. In 1976 the restoration project was approved, and in July 1988 the park was officially opened. On December 12, 1991, it was declared a World Heritage site, together with the associated historic parks in Kamphaengphet and Sukhothai.

Si Satchanalai has been declared a World Heritage site. While it offers similar Sukhothai era temples and monuments, it is much less visited than Sukhothai. The old city of Si Satchanalai is situated in present day Sukhothai province, and can be reached by car from Sukhothai in about one hour (northern direction).
The old city of Si Satchanalai is considered the sister city of historic Sukhothai, and existed contemporary with Sukhothai. Direct family members of the Kings of Sukhothai usually ruled nearby Si Satchanalai. During the reign of King Li Thai (1347-1368) many temples were built and restored at Si Satchanalai.
Three km southeast of the city of Si Satchanalai lies another old historic town called Chaliang, which is believed to already have existed during Khmer rule, and therefore is older than Si Satchanalai.
si satchanalai historical park
There are historic monuments located inside and outside the old city walls. Inside the city walls important temples include : Wat Chang Lom, Wat Chedi Jet Thaew, Wat Nang Phaya.
Wat Chang Lom is located almost at the centre of historic Si Satchanalai. The most important historic building at this temple is the main chedi in Sri Lankan Style. As similar temples at Kamphaeng Phet and Sukhothai, the base of the temple consists of sculptures of elephants. 39 elephants surround the temple. Contrary to what is seen at other temples, the elephants at Wat Chang Lom are standing and very tall.

Moreover Si Satchanalai was an important center for ceramic production and many kilns are scattered around the area. The pottery from this era is usually called Sawankhalok (Sangkalok). There is an interesting small museum (with attached excavated kiln) located at Chaliang and operated by the Si Satchanalai Centre for Study and Preservation of Sangkalok Kilns. Another museum is Sawanworanayok Museum, located in present Sawankhalok town.

The city plan was laid out along fixed cosmological lines โ€“ temple complexes lay at its heart, surrounded by city walls, rivers and forest. It is considered by many historians to be the apogee of Thai city planning. On account of its relation to the Kingdom of Sukhothai it was selected to be on the World Heritage List in 1990. The annual Songkran Festival is held in April within the historical

park itself and throughout the province.

More Infomation
Contact Si Satchanalai Historical Park, Si Satchanalai District, Sukhothai,
tel/fax: 0 5564 1571 or 0 5567 9211

Phanom Rung Historical Park

Phanom Rung Historical Park


Prasaat Phanom Rung and Muang Tam are located in Buriram where is one of the most significant Khmer monuments in Thailand. It was built in the 10th-13th century A.D. Phanom Rung was a Hindu Saivite (Shiva) monastery. Sculptures also present images of Vishnu. A processional way leads through Naga bridges to the main sanctuary. Lintels, pediments depict the Hindu Gods Brahma, Vishnu and Shiva, with also scenes of the Ramayana. The most famous lintel (Vishnu Anantasayin) depicts Vishnu reclining on the back of the Naga King Ananta. This lintel disappeared for many years outside the country, but was recently returned.
Phanom Rung Historical Park
The setting of Phanom Rung is quite scenic, with views of the countryside all around. The site is probably the most visited Khmer monument in Thailand. If you want it quieter, be sure to arrive before 10 A.M.
Muang Tam ('low city') is located nearby, and is worth a visit all by itself. Around its main structure, five 'brick' towers and ponds with lotus flowers are present. There is not much supervision and school children seem to use the area as a playing ground.

Phanom Rung with its full name, Prasat Hin Phanom Rung (Phanom Rung Stone Castle), is a Khmer temple complex set on the rim of an extinct volcano at 1,320 feet above sea level, in Buriram province in the Isan region of Thailand. It was built in sandstone and laterite in the 10th to 13th centuries. It was a Hindu shrine dedicated to Shiva, and symbolises Mount Kailash, his heavenly dwelling.

Thailand's Department of Fine Arts spent 17 years restoring the complex to its original state from 1971 till 1988. On 21 May, 1988, the park was officially opened by Princess Maha Chakri Sirindhorn. In 2005, the temple was submitted to UNESCO for consideration as a future world heritage site.

The Northeast includes many historical monuments in the Khmer style from prehistoric times to the 13th century. Among these, Prasat Hin Khao Phanom Rung is one of the most important. This is the only Khmer religious monument constructed on a natural mountain.
Restorations have made a great contribution to the study of Khmer architecture in Thailand. A special festival is Phanom Rung Fair, held either March or April each year.

After the three-leveled lower stairway, the visitor finds himself on the first cruciform platform with a first peek at the main temple. On the right, northward, is Phlab Phla or the White Elephant House. The pavilion is believed to be the place where kings and the royal family would change attire before rituals. Royalty would then enter the Processional Walkway, one of the most impressive elements of the park. It is 160 meters long and bordered by seventy sandstone posts with tops of lotus buds. The Walkway itself is paved with laterite blocks.

The Walkway leads to the first of three naga bridges. The five-headed snakes face all four directions and are from the 12th century. This bridge represents the connection between heaven and earth. The naga bridge leads to the upper stairway, which is divided into five sets. Each set has terraces on the sides. The last terrace is wide, made with laterite blocks. It has a cruciform shape and four small pools. A couple more steps lead to the second naga bridge. It has the same shape as the first one, only smaller. In the middle the remains of an eight petalled lotus carving can be seen.

This final terrace leads to the outer gallery. It probably used to be a wooden gallery with a tiled roof, but only a raised floor of laterite remains. After the outer gallery one reaches the inner gallery, which is divided in long and narrow rooms. It served as a wall around the principal tower. This last gallery leads to the third and last naga bridge, another small copy of the first one.

The bridge leads you directly into the main sanctuary. After the antechamber and the annex, one reaches the principal tower. Double porches lead out in all directions. The inner sanctum used to have the "linga", the phallic symbol of Shiva. Currently, only the "somasutra" remains which was used to drain water during religious rites. The entrances have various lintels and icons depicting Hindu religious stories, e.g. the dancing Shiva and the five Yogi's. The southern entrance is guarded by a sandstone statue.

Apart from the main tower, other buildings in the compound are:

Two brick sanctuaries built around the 10th century, northeast of the tower.
The minor sanctuary southwest of the tower with a sandstone altar for a sacred image. It was built with sandstone in the 11th century. Prang Noi has only one entrance facing east. The sanctuary is square with indented corners, giving it a round feel.
Two Bannalai southeast and northeast of the principal tower. The buildings are rectangular and have only one entrance. They were built in the last period, around the 13th century, and used as a library for holy scriptures.

Contact Phanom Rung Historical Park, Nang Rong District, Buri Ram,
tel/fax: 0 4463 1746